Our Moral Obligation to Criticize?

kindness

In a management article titled “Radical Candor – The Surprising Secret to Being a Good Boss“, I discovered a quote from the person at the center of the article’s focus, Kim Scott:

“I would argue that criticizing your employees when they screw up is not just your job, it’s actually your moral obligation.”

(If you’d like to take a moment to re-read this quote, or pause to recover from shock, I understand – please take as long as you need.) Continue reading

The Veil of Transparency

transparency

“In the spirit of transparency,” she said, “be sure to send me an update by the end of the week.”

He glanced at her, casually responding, “Of course. And to be transparent, I’ll present the slides to the team at our next meeting.”

Despite the fact I am not clairvoyant, I am quite certain that the above conversation happened today. Perhaps it even happened in your respective place of work. Just like no company executive today would dare admit “we’re not agile”, the popularity of “being transparent” guarantees we assign transparency to everything we do. And so it goes: as everyone becomes “agile”, transparency becomes yet another buzzword in the great agile sea of expected change in peoples’ behavior. Continue reading