Cross-Post: “Seeing the System With the WADE Matrix”

I’ve written a post in collaboration with Derek Wade to share a wonderful retrospective technique I learned from him. The “WADE Matrix” is a simple design to help retrospective participants identify opportunities for improvement, as well as see the cause-effect relationship of the system (beyond the team). This retro format has been my “go-to” method for new teams, new facilitators, and anyone interested in systems thinking.

Colleen Johnson, co-founder of ScatterSpoke (a highly recommended digital tool for facilitating retrospectives), has kindly hosted the article on her ScatterSpoke blog. You can learn about this retrospective technique by following the link below – enjoy!

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TIL: Helping People Understand TDD by Writing a Story

At an agile gathering in St. Louis a few years ago, I learned a pretty nifty game/simulation to help people (especially those unfamiliar with programming) learn basic concepts of TDD. Taught by the ever-so-sensational Amitai Schleier and Mark Balbes, I’ve been meaning to write about this for more than a year. Thanks to a curious member over at the Agile Uprising forums, I finally put it to words. With all credit to Amitai and Mark, this fun little simulation is a good addition to your mentoring toolkit. Continue reading

Scrum Guide Sliders

It was Monday afternoon on her first day of work at a new company and Sarah was feeling anxious. Having studied Scrum over the last few months, Sarah had been hired to serve as a Scrum Master and she was eager to begin applying her new skills, however nothing she had been told today seemed congruent with her lessons. As Sarah listened to her new manager explain why the company’s software required the organization to field a “UI team,” “service team,” and “back-end team,” she felt especially troubled by the phrase she’d heard multiple times on this day: “No one does Scrum by the book.”

“If no one actually follows the design of Scrum,” she wondered to herself, “why did my Scrum trainer teach it to me?”

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Starter Agile, Pt. 3

threebabies

My exploration of “Starter Agile” practices through the lens of Joshua Kerievsky’s “Modern Agile” concludes with this final group of three practices: standup meetings, task decomposition, and cadence-driven retrospective!

Disclaimer: this is my favorite set of practices to critique! Let’s dive in! Continue reading

Starter Agile, Pt. 1

babysteps

After sharing my thoughts on the insights Josh Kerievsky offers us through the lens of “Modern Agile,” I had a few readers request some insight into why I selected certain practices as “Starter Agile.” The comments walked the line between curiosity and concern, the latter being something I want to help alleviate.

Over the next three days, I’ll discuss nine practices and concepts that could be considered outdated as people continue to learn and experiment with Agile. I argue these topics have transitory value for brave folk learning Agile; a good place to get started… but others have discovered better ways exist.

Today’s first set of practices: timeboxes, story points, and velocity. Continue reading

Is Your Agile an Antique?

words

From the point I first discovered Agile in 2005, Joshua Kerievsky has been one of my “self-invited remote mentors”. In other words, Josh provided guidance and mentoring from afar through his writing and speaking – and without the slightest idea of who I am.

A few weeks ago, I finally had the opportunity to meet Josh at Agile Open San Diego. In the confines of open space, Josh convened a session that invited participants to explore his recent “Modern Agile” paper, which formulates a new lens of thought into the evolution of Agile over the years. (If you haven’t read “Modern Agile”, you’re missing out – do that first!)

On the second day of open space, Josh convened an additional session to explore a juxtaposition of “modern” versus “antiquated” Agile. This got me thinking: is it harmful for us to label some practices “antique”? Continue reading